Olympus OMD EM1 MK ii – Personal Photo Projects – Making Photo’s That I know I Wont Keep

This is a photo of an Olympus OMD EM1 MK ii
This is a photo of an Olympus OMD EM1 MK ii
(Click on photo for a full size image) My latest purchase.

Having recently received a small amount of compensation I have bought an Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii. YouTube is a wonderful place to watch tutorials so that I can get to know the camera and how to set it up. Having to camera’s means that I can choose and attach the lens at home for each camera, and hopefully not have to make any changes whilst out. This will reduce the likelihood of getting dust on the sensor. It also means that I have quick options whilst on a shoot. This will be useful at Farnborough airshow, where I want a wide-angle lens for the static aircraft and telephoto for those in the air.

Having a break from my studies until after Farnborough has been wonderful. It has meant that I have caught up with so much of my personal photography projects. I have been able to complete much of my eating disorders photography, although I have no idea how I am going to shoot for PICA or orthorexia, these are also eating disorders, but I trust my creative process.

Naturally I have been walking around with my camera strapped around my neck. It would be wrong not to right? I have been walking around the same places that I have taken many photo’s previously, as I haven’t had the opportunity to travel this past week. I was fully aware that the majority of photo’s that I was taken would be deleted, so why do it?

Photography is about observation, learning to see and gaining understanding of light conditions, and for me it’s mindfulness. If my camera is in my hand I walk slowly, I look around for opportunities to explore composition, to find something new, to spot a bug or a butterfly and to exploit light and tone. This is all good practice and makes me more intuitive as a photographer. Mostly though I love photography.

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Reflections Upon My Latest Anorexia Photo – Exercise 3.4 – Documenting Change – Learning Log

Today has seen me complete a composite photo which I have worked on over the past few months (sen here). It was a project that I had begun a while ago, and then exercise 3.4 of Foundations in Photography required us to create a series of photo’s to document change, which I completed according to the brief. However, I also felt that I could use my anorexia project to document change in one photo.

I created a draft of the project and then sought feedback from my peers (seen here), which was very helpful. I have taken this into consideration since the draft photo, but the most helpful feedback that I received was from a peer who sent me a personal e-mail, and this has had the biggest impact upon my re-working of the photo. Thankyou Sarah.

The photo has many layers which include differing sizes of clothing, which progressively become smaller, all of which were photographed individually, parts of the body and the headstone background.

Sarah suggested that I change the emphasis of the head so that eye was prominent, because of its haunted and piercing gaze. So I erased the other elements of the face, and following comments about different parts of the body I have re-shot them this week.

There were times during which I over complicated things in Photoshop especially with using the background eraser. Overtime I have learned that as I had shot each part separately, I could return to the original photo, layer from background, and use the eraser rather than background eraser. This ensured there were no half erased areas, which looked untidy on my working PSD (the clothing photo has evidence of some partially erased areas). The eraser was better than selection tool – delete, because the selection tool was leaving tatty edges in areas where the tone was similar with the background. Again I have improved this with the photo’s that I made this week by shooting the subject upon a white background. This meant the selection tool became an effective method of getting rid of the unwanted parts of the photo’s.

On of the most tricky aspects has been lining up limbs so that they fit into the shape of the clothing, but I feel that I have got this right today by making use of the transform – warp/perspective tools.

(transform – warp – perspective have been applied)

Overall I am pleased with the result of this photo. I have achieved what I set out to achieve, showing the downward spiral of anorexia and change in body shape, but also I have managed to capture some emotion within the eye, as well as sadness I detect some fear as well. With the figure floating upon the tombstone in an ethereal manner, and the fading of the limbs, sinking into the clothing, then moving towards death becomes apparent.

When I create photography such as this I like to carry a message of hope, which comes in the form of the text which is found underneath the photo. Help is available, recovery is possible.

Testing New Purchases – Prep For Farnborough – C-AF – Macro Learning

Recent Purchases

Mzuiko 75-300mm f/4.8-6.7 ed ii

When I decided to go fully Olympus and trade in my Nikon D7100, I purchased this lens, primarily because it’s coming up to Farnborough airshow. This lens and the OMD’s Micro four thirds 2xcrop ratio, gives me a 150mm – 600mm lens. Which is pretty good for aircraft. Armed forces day was on 30th June so I took the lens over to Scarborough, knowing that they had three mini air displays. The lens is heavy, as to be expected, and on full zoom, 300mm, handshake isn’t always cancelled out by the OMD’s 5 axis image stabilizer. However, when panning the camera to follow the movement of the aircraft, the hand shake becomes irrelevant to a large degree. It’s much more noticeable on those shots when the lens is not panning. This is despite using shutter priority and keeping in between 1/800 and 1/4000. I also have a neuro-muscular condition and this makes hand shake worse sometimes.

There is a down size to this lens, and it’s the same one you get with most cameras at full zoom, and that’s vignetting. Although to give credit where it’s due, this is really apparent on an under exposed image, and decreases as you get closer to the correct exposure, at which point it’s sometimes apparent and others not. So the vignetting is really down to me under-exposing the photos and not keeping my eye on what I was doing.

The Blades Aerobatic Display Team ISO 100 Shutter 1/1000 aperture f6.7 300mm

The above is clearly an underexposed photo. The next image I have developed a little in Lightroom, but I wanted to show one of my favourite photos from the afternoon. There is still a slight halo around the aircraft, which shows that even good exposure doesn’t eliminate the vignette completely. However as you decrease the focal length to around 200mm the vignette isn’t there at all. This is no different than any other non prime telephoto lens.

The Blades Aerobatic Display Team ISO 100 shutter 1/800 aperture f6.7 300mm

C-AF – Continuous auto focus. In preparing myself for Farnborough I wanted to put the OMD and the Mzuiko through their paces, and test the continuous autofocus as I will be shooting fast-moving aircraft. Having completed some research online I ensured that I did not include focus tracking with the C-AF, which is an option with the OMD. The reviews were clear that the tracking works best when much closer to a slower moving subject. Before leaving home I changed the metering to centre weighted instead of the spot that I usually use, and increased the focus area slightly, again instead of the centre point that I often use. It was a mixed result to be honest. At times the C-AF worked wonders, and at others it kept refocusing and going completely out of focus, or focusing on the clouds or passing gulls (which incidently began to mob the aircraft as if they were birds of prey – common behaviour during the breeding season, but with aircraft? That’s a new one on me).

Maybe the inconsistent auto-focus is down to my lack of experience using it, or maybe that’s the way with C-AF for distant objects which are very fast-moving.. The OMD EM10 mk iii doesn’t have the added element of phase detection auto focus, it’s known to not be as quick as other Olympu’s, but when it worked it was exceptional and I have some very clear, crisp photos, and during some highly complex aerobatic maneuvers. The EM10 is probably performing better than its enthusiast+ level, I can’t expect it to be as good as the pro camera OMD EM1 mk ii, and the auto focus on the EM10 is reportedly better than the Pen F, which is aimed between the EM10 enthusiast+ and EM 1 mk ii Pro level in the market. Overall the results were good, and the defects were mostly mine. I need to be more aware of shutter speed and exposure, the camera did what it could to keep up with the fast speed that I was using, but I either needed to increase the ISO or decrease the shutter speed, and that’s completely down to me. Very good preparation for Farnborough, and I know what I need to do to improve my photography of aircraft, including pan more smoothly.

Meike Extenders 10mm and 16mm with electrical contacts

I purchased these so that I could get closer to the subjects in macro photography, and capture sharper details of the eyes and wings of bugs and bees, and closer to the inside of flowers. The Meike extenders for the 4/3 mount has electrical contacts that actually work, so autofocus and aperture changes can be controlled in camera. I have previously had extenders where the electrical connectors didn’t work (for the Nikon), not good.

Iam really impressed. I only used the 16mm (you can combine the two and create a 26mm extender, but you then need to shoot almost touching your subject and the depth of field is so narrow that its difficult to shoot anyway. It was a very windy day, so I had little opportunity to use the set up, but the results were impressive when I was able to. Depth of field is best controlled by using auto focus, half press on shutter release, and in one smooth action press right down and take the shot. If you pause you’re gonna lose the focus. The other way is to use auto focus, and then move your head very slowly backwards and forwards until you have the focus and the focal range that you are seeking for the image. Macro photography is a very gentle, slow, getting to fall in love with your subject before pressing the shutter release – if you want good photo’s. You can’t rush. here are some photos of the same subject – in the last one I hold a 20 pence piece so that you can see just how close the set up brings me and how small the subject is.

The third photo shows just how narrow the depth of field is. The stars are out of focus, but between them they have these little brown leaves – the tips of which are in focus. Only the first photo is good, but I wanted to highlight how narrow the depth of field is. I know that I can get that close now (and take better photo’s than these). The strengths of the extenders are that you have more control eliminating background distractions, you can get closer to your subject and capture the minutiae in fine details (can’t wait to get to shoot more Bee’s), you can create very large photo’s of tiny subjects, the electrical contacts work. The difficulties, you need to be incredibly aware of depth of field, double-check that you have got the focus how you want it where you want it. you lose a couple of stops of light, so it’s better to shoot in bright, sunny conditions, there’s no point shooting in the wind. Theres too much movement to control depth of field. Here’s one more just because I love, love, love macro photography.

ISO 500 shutter 1/125 aperture f2.8 60mm

Dot.foto batteries for OMD EM 10

When I shoot aircraft I do so in burst mode. It’s the last part of the technical elements that I use to capture crisp images of aircraft in flight. With going away to Farnborough, and burst shooting, there is no chance that the one battery I had was going to last me 5 hours of flying and three hours of static and street photography. I took a risk and decided to but the Dot.Foto battery for the OMD rather than the brand version. I got two batteries this way for the same prices instead of one Olympus branded battery. Did the risk pay off? Most definitely. 1127 frames shot, plus an in-camera review and evaluation of half of those (to delete the crap). The frame count sounds high, but shooting in burst you are able to shoot more frames with less battery depletion than when you are constantly turning you camera on and off for individual photos, and this is most certainly the case for the Olympus brand battery as well. My belief is that these batteries are as good as each other, however, I am aware that the performance of the Dot.foto is likely to reduce with repeated charging, whereas the Olympus are more stable and will deplete more slowly. I will keep an eye on that.

One final photos, OK, so the aircraft are not sharp, but couldn’t resist adding this one.

The Blades Over Scarborough Castle

Reflections Upon Leisure – By William Henry Davies – Exercise 3.5 – Photography From Text

Inspiration

The brief asked us to produce a series of photo’s that reflect a piece of written material, and I completed this with my own photography earlier in the coursework (seen here). Having previously read ‘Behind The Image: Research In Photography’ By Anna Fox and Natashe Caruana (2012) I had started to make a photo archive which includes my own photography, photo’s purchased from EBAY and second-hand shops, and photography and articles from newspapers and journals. Creating the archive reminded me of the montage produced by Gerhard Richter’s series Atlas (seen here), in which he makes use of newspaper photo’s and sometimes overlays text  from those same papers.

Initially I was attracted to Richter’s overpainting, and my first response to Atlas was quite negative, it wasn’t something that I liked. However, over a period of time this has grown upon me, and exercise 3.5 gave me the perfect opportunity to try something different.

Technique

The process of selecting which photos and text to include required me to experiment with which worked together on each individual plate, and then create a layout that symbolises the line(s) from the poem (signifier). For example the presentation ‘what is this life if full of care’ (below) is about connections and networks that we create throughout our life and create value for each of us.

What is this life if, full of care,

‘No time to stand beneath the boughs (below) is a reflection upon how precious life is, and that it will end in death – let us enjoy the life we have by slowing down to appreciate it.

No time to stand beneath the boughs,

 

Some of the photo’s and text were cut carefully, and others I tore from the newspaper, I wanted to see the effect of each – my structured mind has resistance to having torn edges, and layouts that are not aligned. The non-aligned layouts work, it creates a scrap-book style, and the torn edges are effective as a physical collage, but this comes out poorly in the photographs of the art.

My aim was to create light box style digital images from the pastiches, and although the process for doing so takes just a few steps – Lightroom, set white balance the same in each image, adjust clarity, contrast, vibrance and exposure to create brightness in the text and pictures, adjustment brush up to the edge of each text/photo – increase exposure to maximum (bright white background). This sounds simple, however auto-mask was tricky for images with a white border and without auto mask the process was time-consuming. The process wasn’t 100% accurately even when I followed up with the auto-masked erase brush. Consequently I was left with some digital artifacts around the edges. They have been removed or altered in some places by exporting to Photoshop and painted out.

Relationship to current photographic trends

There is a lot of talk in relation to how the digitization of photography and the excellent cameras in smart phones, along with social media, have created a situation in which photographs are taken with ease, shared almost instantly and then deleted or never seen again, and only printed on very rare occasions.. The reaction by many professional and academic photographers has been to focus upon the materiality of photography by printing, creating photobooks and making use of scrapbooks and albums to store and present photography. I am in agreement with the argument and have begun to print my own photos, make photo-books and use appropriated images.

However, I don’t think the argument is as simple as it appears. The digitization of photography has meant that old and damaged photos have been saved by uploading them and digitally removing scratches and marks, adding colour, and creating archives or new print’s. There is a saying ‘What goes on the net, stays on the net’. What this means is that if I or you publish a photo on the world wide web, there is always the possibility that it remains as a record that could be permanent even if I delete it. As soon as a photo is published on-line it can be copied, downloaded for individual or collective use, re-posted in a positive manner, or used to troll and embarrass. Deleting my original post in no way guarantees that it has been removed from the web. My creative process has been a representation of this, and a rejection of the view that physical photos are the only ones with intrinsic value.

Although I created the collages as a physical piece of art, once I had created and photographed them I removed them from the white card and returned them  to my archive. Yes I can recreate the physical object as a permanent record because I have kept the photo’s and text, but right now, none of these plates exist in the material form. The only places that these exist are on my hard drive and online. The digitization has provided me with a permanent record of the art I have created.

Difficulties encountered

As mentioned previously, the use of the adjustment brush, which was necessary in order to achieve my objective, has left digital artifacts. You can’t see them unless you zoom in very close, but I can, I know where they exist. The use of  WordPress slide show is the correct presentation for this sequence, however it isn’t possible to adjust the caption text colour on a free site. This meant that white text on a white background left the text unreadable. I have had to return to Photoshop and include a layer the length and position of the caption on the slide show, dark in colour, with reduced transparency, so that the text can be read. It works, but it is not how I want the presentation to be.

Overall

What an enjoyable and interesting project this has been for me. I love photography, so much I cannot express it enough in words. Becoming more involved with photography has increased my creative drive, and this has freed me up to let go of some of my rigid thinking so that I can explore and express myself with other media. Despite the challenges of the adjustment brush, technically this has been straight forward, creatively it has felt powerful and dynamic, but again very simple.

This has been my first attempt at working with these materials and this genre, and there is room for improvement. The photo’s in each plate work well with each other, but tI haven’t created a consistent sequence photographically, and wouldn’t be effective without the captions. Leisure is my favourite poem, and the words create a strong narrative, in future I can strengthen this by using photographs which connect from one plate to the next.

You know what – despite the imperfection (my perfectionism may be easing? Or that inner critical voice may be becoming a touch kinder?), I am pleased and excited about what I have produced.

I’m so pleased that I am now going out into the sun, walking to the cliff’s and I am going to stand and stare.

 

References

Fox, A and Caruana, N; 2012; Behind the image: Research in photography; Switzerland; AVA Publishing SA

Richter, G; 1960-2013; Atlas: Online AT: https://www.gerhard-richter.com/en/art/atlas (accessed on 02/07/2018)

Limited Understanding Of The Male Gaze – Improving Macro Photography

Several women’s football clubs have recently dropped the name … ladies, i.e. Arsenal ladies are now Arsenal Women. This is a huge step to women being treated as equal to men, and progress towards becoming citizens.

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When women are referred to as Ladies they become a myth, they are symbolised as being pure, virginal, chaste and as needing special treatment by men (mustn’t swear in front of a lady, must hold a door open or give up a seat for a lady). This is objectification. This may appear as respect and decency but it is not. When women are objectified in one area they are treated as non citizens. According to the declaration of Human Rights, All men are created equal, and this gives them status as citizens who are given the right to freedom and protection under the Nation’s law. As women are revered as an untouchable, mythological being, they are therefore not equal and human rights are not afforded to them and neither is citizenship. The objectification of women, may appear loving and protective, but as soon as this objectification happens it opens the door for women to be objectified in a myriad of ways.

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With regard to justice it means that women are less likely to go to prison and be given a lesser sentence than men for the same crime. But it also means that if a woman is convicted of a serious violent crime or murder then she is vilified. The case of Ruth Ellis is a good example. Having committed murder she was humiliated in the press, her sexual conduct was brought into question, she was seen as disgustingly promiscuous, immoral and was tried very quickly and hanged. Because she had broken status with the mythological pure woman she was demonised. Also it wasn’t until the 2002 amendments to the Mental Health Act 1983 that promiscuity by women was removed as a treatable mental disorder, and during the late 1980’s it became a crime if a man raped his wife. Before this there was no such thing as marital rape, a man had the right to sex with his wife, whether or not she consented. Currently a woman’s sexual morality is still used against her in some rape trials even though it is not permissible to do so. An immoral women will not be successful in gaining a conviction against the man that raped her. Rape trials have an extremely low conviction rate and consequently many allegations of rape never go to trial.

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Objectification in one area creates objectification in others. Women can be seen as sex objects, the object of a man and an object to be owned, an object to be persued for ownership by men. A lady is mine, you cannot have her, I can treat her as I wish.

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As an untouchable object that is persued for male possession women are romanticised, beautified and glorious, to be viewed by as precious, beautiful sex objects with special status. Their beauty is then subject to art, to sell products, advertising, photography, film and pop. This male gaze is either overtly or covertly sexual in nature and is clear evidence that women are not equal, not citizens and consequently unworthy. The sad truth is ladies are glorious myths worthy of honour and protection, who are also slaves and subject to all manner of abuse.

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Removing the status of the lady and becoming women, is a step towards equality.

Being on holiday, connecting with nature and slowing down has cleared space in my brain to understand Ariella Azoulay’s description of the male gaze in her book The Civil Contract of photography.

Slowing down in nature has meant that I have been photographin birds and making macro photography of flowers.

 

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It’s often said that having a new camera or new equipment will not improve your photography. For a complete beginner this is true, however this isn’t the case once you have gained some small knowledge with regards to making good photography. Having just purchased a prime macro lens the quality of my macro photography has improved considerably. The photos on this post are from my phone not from my Olympus and new prime macro lens.

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Having already learned something of good and bad macro photography from my previous set up, I have been able to make some truly “wonderful to me” photos of flowers. Distractions moved out of the way, knowing whether I’m documenting the flower (neutral background), creating a pretty scene (aesthetically pleasing background), using aperture to make a beautiful background and sharp, crisp subject, avoiding moire, and exposing for the highlights (ignoring cameras exposure guide and using settings based upon what I see in the view finder). All of this means I can now make macro photography of a decent standard.

 

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I’m a happy bunny. My smart phone has a pro manual mode which means I’ve also created some good macro shots with this device. The photos throughout this post have been made on my Huawei mobile phone.

My final photo wasn’t taken in pro mode. You know how much I love a windfarm.

 

 

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Two Shoots In One Day – Part Three Nearly Complete – Busy Week Ahead Pufflings

I’m exhausted and I really should be in bed already. The busy week ahead is fun. Photography for enjoyment, slowing down, mindfulness and switching off. Fingers crossed that I see and photograph Pufflings – I’ve not made that up, baby puffins are indeed called Pufflings.

There hasn’t been the time to catch up with everyone’s blogs today as I have been making photos for part thee of Foundations in Photography, which is now almost complete. I have one more shoot to do, which is the compliment to one of today’s shoots. Then I have to develop and upload everything.

I have a large collection of crystals and minerals. and I’ve been photographing them in different environments over the past week, for exercise 3.12 (2014 manual), Photography as Research.

In collaboration with a friend I have the photos ready for 3.7 A Significant Object.

Today I have undertaken a part of exercise 3.10 – A Formal Portrait. I’ve blogged before about how I need to make this shoot different from the brief, so I’m taking the time to follow my tutors advice from the conclusion of assignment two. For this I’m going to create a body of work which questions identity, and today I’ve been exploring gender. I’m pleased with today’s results, and I look forward to making the photos for the contrasting set. Gender and gender identity have been featured on the news and in journals a lot recently. Gender is such a broad field that I have narrowed my view down to gender identity. What is gender? Male, female, transgender, gender non binary, gender queer, asexual, third gender. Self identification has become a hot topic and it’s now possible, in some countries, to have your gender altered on your birth certificate and passport, and in more enlightened Nations it’s possible to tick a box for Non-Binary gender. The following is just a test shot and doesn’t include the props or staging.

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A Staged Photo is one option for assignment three – A Narrative Photograph. At the start of part three I had an idea which I wanted to explore in relation to gambling. It’s been in the news a lot recently due to fixed odds betting terminals, and their impact upon individuals, families and communities. There has been some government intervention over the past couple of years, with the development of gambleaware.co.uk . On the one hand I think it’s a good idea to have a specific means of help for those who identify that they may have a gambling problem, but my main belief is that it’s a token gesture so the government looks like it’s tackling gambling addiction, when in reality it’s doing as little as it possibly can. The government has no intent on helping those with, nor preventing, gambling addiction. There’s far too much tax involved for the government to want to change the status quo.

My staged photo is an exploration of this. Here’s a taster from today’s shoot.

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There isn’t going to be the chance to follow your blogs for around three days. Phone signal is poor where I’m going, so I’ll catch up on Thursday. Happy snapping.

Developing My Own Critical Eye

There have been two exercises that I have recently completed in which I have disagreed with the brief from the Foundations in Photography manual. My view on Sophie Calle was so far removed from what Enoch had written, I even felt anger at his comments, which I felt were so far removed from the truth that I considered his words to be airy fairy artistic bullshit (see here).

I have just written a review of Ray’s A Laugh by Richard Billingham (see here), and again I disagree with the brief from the manual. Billingham’s photo’s were not taken as a visual document for research purposes. They were taken as a record to explore his thoughts and feelings about his family, in order that he could make a painting that had an emotional impact, and make a statement.

The above are my opinions, they aren’t fact and I accept that I could be way off of the mark. This means that I am either getting something wildly wrong and missing the point, or that I am developing a critical eye in how I view the photography and writing of others. Whether I am right or wrong with my opinions is irrelevant, we all view photography differently, so differently in fact that I will say that if Ray’s A Laugh was really worthy of a Turner Award then the Turner Awards are a meaningless waste of space, that have no value in a genuinely creative community.

What is relevent is that I am learning how to critique photography, and with the acknowledgement that my reading is based upon the sum of my own personal experiences, which is naturally a biased view. This doesn’t mean that my interpretation is any less or more relevent that the Turner Award judges, or that of Enoch.

I am really grateful that the Foundations in Photography manual asks us to review many photographers and photos because I am gaining a deeper insight into the creativity, technicality and interpretation of photography, and this develops my purpose and vision with the photography that I create. No matter how I make photos, and consider the impact, questions or narrative that I want to express, others, just like me, will form their own opinions, and these may be far removed than my intent.

This tells me that I should make photos for me, but considered photos in which I slow down and explore the impact of the subject upon myself. What detracts from my intended meaning? What enriches and enhances my expression?Critical-Eye

 

Reference

Enoch, R; 2014; Foundations in Photography; Barnsley; OCA

Going Fully Olympus (Almost)

I purchased the Olympus OMD EM 10 mk iii around Christmas, and I’m really pleased that I did. It’s lightweight, easy to carry, easy to use, good manual controls and I like the quality of the images. It is a touch noisy when shooting indoors in low light, but no more so than any other camera and better than many.

I’ve decided to trade in my Nikon D7100 which is heavy for me to carry with my neuro-muscular condition.

As the Nikon was great for macro with the set up that I had then I’ve brought the Mzuiko 60mm f2.8 macro, and if I find I want to get in closer thenI’ll buy a Canon 250d front end macro converter that works with Mzuiko.

I’ve also ordered the Mzuiko 75-300 which out performs the Tamron 18-270 that I had with the Nikon, so I’ll have the range of focal lengths that I want for events, especially airshows/sport.

There currently isn’t a teleconverter for this lens that I’m aware of, so I’m going to keep my Fuji s9900 bridge for birds, it’s possible poor quality but I get a few good bird photos from it.

If any one knows of a 1.4 or 2 times converter, from any brand, that’s compatible with the Mzuiko 75-300 then I would be grateful to hear about it.

Wet Collodion Ambrotype (c1854) Direct Positive On Glass – An Amazing Gift I Have Just Recieved

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Can you believe that I have been given this? I can’t. The photo looks better in the flesh than the scanned image, the scanner doesn’t appear to be able to pick up the detail through the glass, and I refuse to take it out of the frame.

He is an ancestor of mine, and we can date the photo from in between 1851 when the ambrotype began to be used, and 1860 because of family events. My cousin has given me a lot of photos of our ancestors, from her family line, most of which are pre war. I am feeling very blessed and very grateful.

The next two photos are from c1888 and c1902 respectively.

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Creating A Photo Archive – The Materiality Of Photography – Recent And Current Reading

Following on from reading Behind The Image: Research In Photography (Fox, A and Caruana, N; 2012), I have decided to start my own photographic archive. My current sources are newspapers and magazines, ebay for purchasing used photo’s (it’s bloody strange viewing a family’s wedding photo’s, but other than that it good) and printing some of my own photo’s. Gerhard Richter makes collages using text as well as photo’s and this idea has grown upon me, so I am also collecting snippets that I like. There are also themes and issues which are important to me, such as Palestine/Israel, gender and sexuality, mental health, women as role models (without comparing to men, just strong images and stories about women and their chosen roles). With these I am collecting stories not just headlines. This is a valuable part of me gaining a deeper understanding off societal issues, and a new perspective, as well as the research required to deepen my photographic understanding and practice.

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Returning photography into a physical form creates a lasting document. I’ve purchased a cork board so that I can pin photo’s onto it, which means I can get used to viewing my own photography and gaining deeper understanding into how I work as a photographer. The time difference between taking photo’s and pinning them to the board also removes some of my emotional attachment to the work which I produce. Photographs that I used to like are sometimes less important, and I perceive them as being of a lower quality than I originally thought, and of course this works the other way around as well. There are a few photos that I really was not keen on when I developed them, that now stand out as being good images.

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Fun, interesting, rewarding.

Reading List (Recent and Current)

The fiction and non-fiction which I read are just as important to me and my development as a thinker and photographer as the reading that I enjoy about photography.

Jesmyn Ward; Sing, Unburied, Sing (fiction) – Carol Anne Lee; The Hidden Life Of Otto Frank (biography) – Ian Black; Enemies And Neighbours: Arabs And Jews In Palestine And Israel, 1917 – 2017 (non-fiction) – Sophie Calle; Suite Venitienne (photography) –  Seth Joel; Photographing Still Life (photography) – Arthur Lubow; Diane Arbus: Portrait Of A Photographer (photography) – Archna Singh; The Immortals (photography)

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Reference

Fox, A and Caruana, N; 2012; Behind The Image: Research In Photography; Lausanne; AVA Publishing SA