Sick Of Bulimia

Sick Of Bulimia


Bulimia is an eating disorder, a psychiatric illness. eating disorders have the highest death rate of all of the mental illness. Between ten and twenty percent of people with an eating disorder will die as a consequence of this illness. Those deaths are attributed to heart failure, organ failure and suicide.

Bulimia (or bulimia nervosa) is a serious mental illness. It can affect anyone of any age, gender, or background. People with bulimia are caught in a cycle of eating large quantities of food (called bingeing), and then trying to compensate for that overeating by vomiting, taking laxatives or diuretics, fasting, or exercising excessively (called purging). Early intervention offers the best chance for a rapid and sustained recovery from bulimia.(Source link)

If you have an eating disorder – recovery is possible, speak to a family member, someone you trust, a doctor, or search google for an eating disorder service in your country.

United Kingdom


Men Get Eating Disorders Too

United States





The Minds Foundation













Gun Control Versus Mental Health

The victims of gun crime and their family and friends are in my thoughts and prayers.

I am astounded by Donald Trump’s belief that gun control is not the issue “We are committed to working with state and local leaders to help secure our schools and tackle the difficult issue of mental health.”

It is reported that “One in six U.S. adults lives with a mental illness (44.7 million in 2016).” Source link.

In the UK mental health precedence is slightly higher according to statistics from the government and also from MIND, the national mental health charity. “One-in-four adults and one-in-ten children experience mental illness during their lifetime, and many more of us know and care for people who do.” Source link

The USA has the highest rate of gun homicide in the developed world, 16 times higher than Germany.

This despite the reality that the mental illness rates per capita are similar, and some countries have a higher prevalence of mental illness. Clearly, mental illness is not the problem.

Since 1968 more Americans have been killed by other Americans as a result of fire arms, than have been killed in all of the wars the US has been involved in since the founding of America. “Since 1968, when these figures were first collected, there have been 1,516,863 gun-related deaths on US territory. Since the founding of the United States, there have been 1,396,733 war deaths. That figure includes American lives lost in the revolutionary war, the Mexican war, the civil war (Union and Confederate, estimate), the Spanish-American war, the first world war, the second world war, the Korean war, the Vietnam war, the Gulf war, the Afghanistan war, the Iraq war, as well as other conflicts, including in Lebanon, Grenada, Panama, Somalia and Haiti.” Source link

The death rates are horrific. In 2015 over 13,200 US citizens were murdered by a gun “All shootings: Some 13,286 people were killed in the US by firearms in 2015, according to the Gun Violence Archive, and 26,819 people were injured [those figures exclude suicide]” Source link

In 2015, four times as many Americans were killed by their fellow US citizens than had been killed by terrorists between 2001 and 2013, a twelve year period. “According to the U.S. State Department, the number of U.S. citizens killed overseas as a result of incidents of terrorism from 2001 to 2013 was 350.

In addition, we compiled all terrorism incidents inside the U.S. and found that between 2001 and 2013, there were 3,030 people killed in domestic acts of terrorism.* This brings the total to 3,380.” These statistics include the horror of those killed in September 11th. Source link

In the UK, in between April 2014 and March 2015, 19 people were murdered with a firearm. “There were 19 fatalities resulting from offences involving firearms in the year ending March 2015; 10 fewer than the previous year and the lowest since the series began in 1969.” Source link

Despite having similar rates of mental illness, the gun crime and death rates are significantly higher in The United States.

This is a tragedy. It is also shameful.

The Bill of Rights Second Amendment  right of the people to keep and bear arms  was signed on December 15th 1791. This right was granted as a means of protection by a regulated militia to protect the state. Source link

This Right is outdated and is no longer a protection for the State nor the citizens of The United States. The second amendment has become the number one means by which Americans can kill Americans.

It saddens me to know that there is too much personal and political pressure to maintain the right to gun ownership. How many more American individuals, families, friends, communities, colleagues will have to tragically be killed and suffer and grieve before Americans realise that mental illness does not cause gun crime, access to guns causes gun crime.


With many thanks to Shaneka, and all at The Sociological Mail for publishing my essay.


Good News For One Of The Guys From My Homelessness Photo Essay

One of the guys that was kind enough to allow me to photograph him for my photo essay on homelessness has just moved into a bedsit. He’s in the process of applying for a buskers license as well. It’s made my day.

If you want to have a look at my photo essay (my first published article) you can see it at Homelessness – People are Only Invisible When We Choose to Ignore Them.

Homelessness – People Are Only Invisible If We Choose To Ignore Them

The aim of this project is to encourage people to stop and speak to somebody that is sitting on the street or selling the Big Issue. If you do not have the time, then make eye contact as you walk past and wish them a good day. People are only invisible if we ignore them.

My motivation for this project developed from seeing a poster on several shop walls, which had been produced by a local council and several homeless charities. It stated that there was enough support by the council, soup kitchens and charities in the town, so could we stop giving to people on the streets, and donate to the charities instead. It also stated that by giving money we are deterring people from seeking help.

I am not saying that we should give money, but I found the poster to be a somewhat callous and cold-hearted approach to take. There are some wonderful homeless charities in the UK and I am in favour of the great work that they do. However, the posters raised questions for me. If you are homeless, what is it like to have people walk past you and ignore you? If the council and charities are winning the battle against homelessness then why are people on the streets? Why does the government rely on charities to try to improve the circumstances for homeless people and not do more? The posters, which are effectively asking the public to ignore the plight of people living on the streets, are encouraging us to further invalidate those individuals. The majority of the people who are on the streets ARE linked into their local council and charities, and these are failing individuals and to relieve homelessness.

The government piloted “No Second Night Out” in London during April 2011. Its stated aim is that they are ”Committed to ensuring that no individual arriving on the streets will sleep out for a second night.” and to “end rough sleeping in London”. The pilot has now been implemented nationwide. Although NSNO reports that is a success, the research from Crisis tells a different story “Government street counts and estimates give a snapshot of the national situation. The latest figures showed that 4,134 people slept rough across England on any given night in 2016 – a 16% increase compared to the previous year, and more than double the amount in 2010.” (Quote) With homelessness having doubled since 2010 we can see clearly that NSNO is not working.

Most homeless people have suffered trauma, a dysfunctional upbringing/home-life or have suffered from other forms of social exclusion. To be homeless is to be vulnerable, to be at risk of violence, to have restricted access to health care and to have less opportunity for well-being and employment. In December 2016, The Guardian newspaper reported: “of people who had slept rough in the past 12 months, 55.5% had experienced being verbally abused or harassed – 15 times higher than the general population.” (Quote).

When you meet someone on the street stop and have a chat. Acknowledgement and being valued as a member of society are basic human needs. It is also good to check whether people are accessing local support and if they are not then you can seek details of support services and provide them to the individual. You can contact Street Link if you know someone sleeping rough, and they will then look out for them, and link them in with local support. All councils have a Housing Options team, which provides guidance and support for homeless people. Most homeless people are aware of, and accessing local services, but it is useful information to have and to pass on if required.

If you would like to know more about homelessness or make a donation to the national charity for homeless people then please contact Crisis. Homelessness:-

If you have had at least 1 days’ pay from the armed forces then there are several charities who would like to support you. Combat Stress, Royal British Legion, SSAFA

There are many charities that support rough sleepers and vulnerably housed people and there are links to them below the photos.



L – July 2017

L does not like to sit with his hat in front of him, but circumstances have left him quite desperate. He prefers to sit without begging and allow the power of suggestion to present a question to passers by. When you see someone who needs help do you stop or do you pass them by?



J – May 2017

J is a combat veteran. Next time you see someone sitting on the street, stop and say hello. You may realise you have more in common than you think.


M – May 2017

Warm, friendly and despite his circumstance he remains hopeful and Jolly.


DB – May 2017

DB is intelligent, kind and funny. He is also ex-armed forces and says “Homelessness can happen to anyone”.


KJ and R – April 2017

KJ and R, are vulnerably housed. They both have physical and mental health issues. They find that friendship helps them cope with very challenging circumstances.


J and V – April 2017

J has been homeless for many years of his life. His only wish is that Nations and individuals work together to make the planet a better place.


MB – March 2017

MB was kind enough to allow me to take his photo. I have pixelated part of the image at his request.


R and E – March 2017

R and E both have serious health conditions to cope with, which are exacerbated by sitting on the streets.


R – March 2017

R is being informed he is not allowed to beg, and that if he does not move on then the police will be called to remove him. R praised some of the local police who have gone out of their way to help him, buy him a sandwich and have a chat with him.


M – March 2017

M has been told he cannot have his dog Rocky with him in temporary homeless accommodation. Rocky was R’s companion before he became homeless and has helped him to cope with his physical and mental health.


People are only invisible if we choose to ignore them is an ongoing project by Richard Keys –

References and Support Services

Combat Stress



Homeless Link

Royal British Legion



Street Link

The Big Issue Foundation


I would like to express my gratitude to Shaneka and The Soiological Mail for publishing this essay.

Proud of Pride

Pride is a celebration of diversity and gender in all of its many forms. It’s an opportunity for the LGBTQ community, friends, family and supporters to gather together and be proud of being who we are. Being visible as a community means that equality and diversity can be promoted and homophobia and discrimination can be challenged by presence and a carnival atmosphere.